PSF Residency: Post #5

It’s Wednesday evening (Feb 1, 2012), and today I drew for the first time inside the warehouse at Portland Store Fixtures. It was good. Comfy quarters (warmth, light, pleasant music), the staff was altogether pleasant, and I had a drawing companion, comrade Jane, to buck me up and keep me from feeling too self-conscious.

We didn’t do a lot — meandered around the res a bit, got something to drink at the cafe near the PCC building, and then sat in front of a bunch of manikins and did our drawings.

JOU Manikin2, pencil on paper, 10 x 12″ 2012

 

JOU, Manikin1, pencil on paper, 10 x 12″, 2012

I’m presenting the drawings here for the record — can’t claim more than that.

Painting the manikins in the warehouse will be coming along soon, although I need to do a lot more on Plant 5, up the street. I’ve begun a largish canvas of the Plant 5 funnel, but I have plans for a hockney-ish pano (A la Pear Blossom Highway) of the plant’s facades on Main Street, done plein air on panels and then on canvas in the studio.

Plans are cheap. But so was the drawing:-) –June

Bits and Bytes: Day 33, Dec. 3, 09

Yesterday, I took the day off and was playing at painting the Beatty Community Center when the silver Honda pulled up with David Lancaster and all his photo equipment. So I got to exploit the photographer. Actually he had set up and done some phtography before he found me, but at the Barn, after some mugs with the big pano, I decided to take off the tape from the panels.

You can see the beginning of the process — that’s me on the step stool.

And here are the panels, without the tape. Oh wondrous-much!

Un-oriented Amargosa, 5′ x 28′, Oil on linen, 2009

After more mugs with the panos (ho-hum — the panels are better by themselves), I further exploited the photographer by making him take mug shots of me and the desert. I understand that the competition is scarcely fair — one can’t compete with the desert. But David did his best and we had a jolly time of not being formal about the process, nor the product.

Ultimately David got serious and photographed the real subject with the incidental one standing in front:

I’m astonished at what he could capture in the bright desert sun. There’s my scene, although I’m not looking in the right direction. I kept telling him my best side was the other one, but he ignored me.

Thank you, David Lancaster, superb photographer, raconteur, and friend.

Reporting from Beatty, Nevada, at the Goldwell House, part of the Goldwell Open Air Museum.

"Finished" Done, Complete, Replete, the End: Nov 30, 2009

I have declared the big linen panorama “finished.” Note the quotes. I almost never finish a work until it has sat and thought for a while. And until I have sat and looked for a while. However, we will hold an Open Studio next Saturday, pack up the Studio Sunday, pack up the house after that, and wend our leisurely way back to Portland, Oregon, avoiding winter storms as much as possible. The panels should be dry enough to roll and transport by next Sunday. I don’t dare add another stitch of paint until we are back home.

So here are the seven panels. Tomorrow Jer and I are going down the Beatty Cut-off to Death Valley, where I’m going to paint landscape in proper perspective with proper coloring and properly conventional notions. When we come back, weather and desire permitting, it’s little hamlet-scapes around Beatty; I still have the Community Center to deal with, and I would rather like to paint that Joshua Tree with its big rock and 5 huge satellite dishes.

David Lancaster may be able to come up from Vegas this week with proper lights and get some good photos, but these will have to do for the nonce. Sometime later this week, I will try to add photos which combine the pieces, so you can get a sense of the panoramic scope. And I might even make comments. But tonight, it’s just each panel, one at a time, photography by JOU. And no journaling until I get combos photographed, which will be sometime before Sunday. No promises beyond that.

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 1 (east) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 2 (east) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 3 (east) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 4 (center) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 5 (west)) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 6 (west)) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 7 (west)) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Of course, the titles with their directions are “oriented”, making a veritable lie of the rest of the title.

And I should, for the sake of the record, add that some of these panels (the ones in the center)  went through 3 versions today, and many before that. I had one version done when Jer showed up. He took a walk and I saw other things to do to those panels, and when he came back, he had further suggestions that were quite good and so had to be dealt with.  I had previously revised the panels after hearing Suzanne and Charles’ suggestions (all of which I took, albeit perhaps not quite as they imagined). David Lancaster may be able to come up from Vegas this week with proper lights and get some good photos, but these will have to do for the nonce.

So look and look again, at the desert, at the canvas, at your mind, at your paints. And then look again.

When we left, after sunset tonight, the Desert Flower sculpture which lies in the Barn’s yard was shining in the waning light while the almost full moon was glistening above. It was glorious and heart-breaking.

Reporting on the last day of November on the last day of the big project painting from the Goldwell House, run by the Goldwell Open Air Art Foundation, in Beatty, Nevada, home to Beatty Mountain and the Beatty Merc. And an almost full moon tonight.