"Finished" Done, Complete, Replete, the End: Nov 30, 2009

I have declared the big linen panorama “finished.” Note the quotes. I almost never finish a work until it has sat and thought for a while. And until I have sat and looked for a while. However, we will hold an Open Studio next Saturday, pack up the Studio Sunday, pack up the house after that, and wend our leisurely way back to Portland, Oregon, avoiding winter storms as much as possible. The panels should be dry enough to roll and transport by next Sunday. I don’t dare add another stitch of paint until we are back home.

So here are the seven panels. Tomorrow Jer and I are going down the Beatty Cut-off to Death Valley, where I’m going to paint landscape in proper perspective with proper coloring and properly conventional notions. When we come back, weather and desire permitting, it’s little hamlet-scapes around Beatty; I still have the Community Center to deal with, and I would rather like to paint that Joshua Tree with its big rock and 5 huge satellite dishes.

David Lancaster may be able to come up from Vegas this week with proper lights and get some good photos, but these will have to do for the nonce. Sometime later this week, I will try to add photos which combine the pieces, so you can get a sense of the panoramic scope. And I might even make comments. But tonight, it’s just each panel, one at a time, photography by JOU. And no journaling until I get combos photographed, which will be sometime before Sunday. No promises beyond that.

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 1 (east) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 2 (east) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 3 (east) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 4 (center) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 5 (west)) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 6 (west)) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Unoriented Amargosa, Panel 7 (west)) 4′ x 5′, Oil on linen, 2009

Of course, the titles with their directions are “oriented”, making a veritable lie of the rest of the title.

And I should, for the sake of the record, add that some of these panels (the ones in the center)  went through 3 versions today, and many before that. I had one version done when Jer showed up. He took a walk and I saw other things to do to those panels, and when he came back, he had further suggestions that were quite good and so had to be dealt with.  I had previously revised the panels after hearing Suzanne and Charles’ suggestions (all of which I took, albeit perhaps not quite as they imagined). David Lancaster may be able to come up from Vegas this week with proper lights and get some good photos, but these will have to do for the nonce.

So look and look again, at the desert, at the canvas, at your mind, at your paints. And then look again.

When we left, after sunset tonight, the Desert Flower sculpture which lies in the Barn’s yard was shining in the waning light while the almost full moon was glistening above. It was glorious and heart-breaking.

Reporting on the last day of November on the last day of the big project painting from the Goldwell House, run by the Goldwell Open Air Art Foundation, in Beatty, Nevada, home to Beatty Mountain and the Beatty Merc. And an almost full moon tonight.

5 thoughts on “"Finished" Done, Complete, Replete, the End: Nov 30, 2009

  1. Hopefully my next residency will be Denali, but I haven’t been accepted yet so I’ll wait and see. I should be thinking of a plan B though..

    If you like dunes, the artist who came after me at Great Sand Dunes had a Flash-Drive-sized WIFI hub on her laptop that she could connect to the internet on Verizon…not sure how fast it was. Only Verizon works out there, but you might want to check it out…

    I started posting my Great Sand Dunes journal on my blog, check in in the next few weeks for updates…http://hodge-artandnature.blogspot.com/2009/11/great-sand-dunes-journal-first.html

    Kathy

  2. Thanks, Sheila,

    In the desert there wasn’t anything but color to work with — all composition, basically, depended on that. So I looked and looked at color until now I can’t see green, only viridian with a bit of titanium, or sap with some Zinc white or terre verte (Winsor-Newton rather than Gamblin) or perylene black, which is really green, or, rarely, something with a bit of yellow mixed into the green. Oh, I forgot davy’s gray and payne’s gray with ochre. So if I did nothing else, I learned to see color where it wasn’t obvious.

    Thanks for checking in during this month. I’ve liked hearing from you.

  3. Thanks, Kathy, I really appreciate your checking in. When is your next residency? I was in Death Valley today and think that maybe the sand dunes at Stovepipe Wells need some panoramic, AM and PM treatment. It’s close to a cluster of motel/camping spots and even, so we are told, has “erratic” wi-fi. This last is important to Jer, and what’s important to Jer is vital to me, since he’s not only a husband and friend, but also my driver and artist’s assistant. But he won’t assist unless there’s high speed internet nearby. But Death Valley was astonishing in the full moon as we drove home. The Amargosa looked utterly civilized by comparison. So I’m already thinking…….

  4. Glorious! I can’t help but notice the beautiful skies. Always surprised at the multitude of colors you have pulled out of an area my mind says is bleak and monotone. Bravo!

  5. Ohhhh…done already? That went fast…and I’m sorry that I won’t be able to live vicariously through your painting–until next time!

    They came out beautiful, you can really tell when they’re photographed straight on and all squared up. The color is great. The structure is real. Congratulations!

    Thanks for sharing your experiences…many times it was the bright spot in my cubicle!

    Kathy

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